Category Archives: historical fiction

Top 14 Books of 2014

Dearest ones! It’s that time of year again–to FREAK THE F OUT BECAUSE YOU STILL NEED PRESENTS FOR PEOPLE ON YOUR EVER-LOVIN’ LIST! Never fear, stressed Santas. You may have heard that #BooksMakeGreatGifts, and since you no doubt do not have time to sit down and read a bunch of them right this very second, I will recommend some for you, with Cliff Notes. Also luckily, 2014 was a terrific year for reading! So many astonishingly good books by debut and esteemed authors. Put these in your sack, and if you have time, enjoy before giving (just make sure not to eat chocolate while reading. Those fingerprints will give you away every time).

#FridayReads: THE CHILDREN’S BLIZZARD by David Laskin

In solidarity with our buried friends in Buffalo this past week, for my #FridayReads I dug out this book from the middle of my TBR stack: THE CHILDREN’S BLIZZARD by David Laskin.

The Children's Blizzard by David LaskinI should have hated this book. Because I hate snow. Or, to be more specific, l hate being OUT in snow. I hate driving in snow. I very much dislike walking the dog in snow. I do not enjoy being cold, wet, having my eyelashes stuck together, or discomfort, and as long as I am observing the snow from the wrong side of the window, I do. Not. Like It.

#FridayReads! Top-Notch Historical Fiction: THE SEA CAPTAIN’S WIFE by Beth Powning

I just read the best historical novel, y’all. It’s about a sea captain’s wife, Azuba Galloway, in 1860s Nova Scotia who yearns to accompany her husband on his ship, the Traveller–and the amazing and unfathomable events that befall her and her little daughter, Carrie, when she does. (If you read my last post, you now know that I’m not writing about seafaring–or am I? Maybe I’m using reverse psychology…HAHAHAHAHA.)

Screen Shot 2014-11-21 at 11.59.37 AMWhat makes this such good historical fiction–what do I look for in historical fiction?

Friday Reads: AN UNSEEMLY WIFE, by E.B. Moore

Dear Readers,

Every once in a while you come across a book that contains a scene so memorable that it elevates the story from being a good read to great literature. An event so haunting you reread the story for years to come just to read that scene, because you know it’s coming, even as you wince in foreknowledge for the poor characters. A scene that makes you think, “Oh no, she DIDN’T!” at the writer because what she just did to her people was so terrible yet true, because he was brave enough to do it.

I’m thinking of Flannery O’Connor’s “A Good Man Is Hard To Find,” for instance, when the Misfit takes the family into the woods.

HAPPY BOOKBIRTHDAY! to Pam Jenoff’s WW2 novel THE WINTER GUEST

Dear Readers,

Please join me in wishing HAPPY BOOKBIRTHDAY! to historical novelist Pam Jenoff’s THE WINTER GUEST. I had a sneak preview of Pam’s newest novel, about twin sisters in wartime Poland who take very different approaches to the Nazi occupation of their country, and found it authentic, atmospheric, and riveting–a must-read for any aficionado of WW2-era fiction. I hope you feel the same!

Pam Jenoff's THE WINTER GUEST

To purchase THE WINTER GUEST, please click here.

Happy reading!

~ Jenna.

Friday Reads: THE WIVES OF LOS ALAMOS, by TaraShea Nesbit

Dear Readers,

Today’s #FridayReads brings me back to the stunning debut novel! This week’s is THE WIVES OF LOS ALAMOS, by TaraShea Nesbit.

I had the privilege of participating in a round table writing discussion last week with novelists Rebecca Rotert (more about her soon!) and TaraShea, and I was enthralled by TaraShea’s description of her novel, which went something like this: